You are here

CEMS Fall Conference - Call for Presentations - Due July 17

2017 FALL CONFERENCE CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

The Future of Environmental Management in Colorado: 
Challenges, Big Ideas, and Solutions for the 21st Century

Tuesday, October 10th 7:30am – 6:00pm (reception to follow) at Coors Field

CONFERENCE OVERVIEW: Recent events highlight how the perception, understanding, and response to risk and environmental hazards inevitably evolve over time.  This conference seeks to identify the challenges on the horizon, and explore the many ways environmental professionals can use our expertise with current regulations and historical environmental challenges to position Colorado to solve the environmental challenges of tomorrow.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: Colorado Representative Jeni Arndt; Colorado Senator John Cooke (Invited);
Martha Rudolph (CDPHE Director of Environmental Programs);

CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS: We seek thought-provoking presenters that constructively and critically examine the status quo, describe current or anticipated future challenges, provide insight on the key(s) to success, and generally stimulate discussion on how we, as environmental professionals in Colorado, can anticipate, react, and rise up to the environmental challenges of the 21st century.  Suggested topics include:

Regulatory Compliance in the 21st Century

  • Overview of new regulations/guidance
  • Changes to existing regulations including TSCA reform
  • Challenges and opportunities within existing regulatory frameworks
  • Product stewardship
  • Permitting and reporting

Stakeholder Engagement

  • Community outreach
  • Risk perception and tolerance
  • Science-based decision making
  • Engagement with public agencies, elected officials, and policymakers
  • Environmental/social/economic justice for impacted communities

Emerging Contaminants

  • Hazard identification and assessment
  • Standards development and protectiveness assessments
  • Environmental aspects of commercial-scale cannabis production and use

Environmental Stewardship in the 21st Century

  • Understanding and anticipating societal expectations and needs
  • Perspectives on motives for stewardship
  • The true cost of environmental compliance and remediation
  • Reclaiming impacted properties and land

Additional context regarding suggested presentation topics is provided on the following pages.

                                           DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMITTAL:  July 17, 2017

Please submit your Title, Abstract/Summary (<500 words), Author(s), Affiliation(s), and
Biography (<200 words)
in a MS Word-compatible format to Steve Brauner at sbrauner@integral-corp.com

SPONSORSHIP SIGNUP/QUESTIONS
Contact Brad Coleman at bacoleman@burnsmcd.com / 303-362-2335

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION OPENS:  August 1, 2017

Additional information at www.COEMS.org or by contacting
Steve Brauner at 303-328-7982 / sbrauner@integral-corp.com

                                            Suggested Presentation Topics

Topic #1: Regulatory Compliance in the 21st Century is intended to examine recent and anticipated changes in regulatory focus, regulations, and guidance for environmental compliance and cleanup.

  • Subtopic #1A: Overview of new regulations/guidance
  • Focus on new regulations or guidance (recent or soon-to-be in-place) that significantly impact compliance or cleanup.
  • Subtopic #1B: Changes to existing regulations including TSCA reform
  • Focus on changes to regulations or guidance (recent or soon-to-be in-place) that significantly impact compliance or cleanup.
  • Recent TSCA reform has changed EPA’s mandate authority to assess human health and environmental risks irrespective of cost, including the authority to require testing and approval of new and existing chemicals.
  • How is the change in focus and authority impacting regulatory compliance and cleanup?
  • Subtopic #1C: Challenges and opportunities within existing regulatory frameworks
  • What challenges are we facing (as an industry/profession) that are caused by unintended consequences of existing legislation, rules, and regulations? 
  • How might we use or change existing frameworks to reduce cost and improve outcomes for compliance?
  • Subtopic #1D: Product stewardship
  • Chemical manufacturers are facing increased pressure, from both consumers and regulators, to ensure new and existing chemicals do not cause undue harm, with the consequences of unanticipated harm providing both a financial and public image/relations threat. 
  • A foundational element of the TSCA reform is the requirement that EPA conduct a risk assessment for all new chemicals and significant new uses, as well as prioritize the risk evaluation and regulation of existing chemical substances. 
  • How can we support this increased expectation of protecting manufacturers, consumers, and the larger community?
  • Subtopic #1E: Permitting and reporting
  • What’s new in permitting and reporting requirements for compliance and/or cleanup?

 

Topic #2: Emerging Contaminants is intended to show how we can apply lessons learned from evaluating risk and developing solutions to previous “new contaminants” (e.g., fuel oxygenates) to anticipate, expedite, and proactively manage challenges associated with emerging contaminants (e.g., PFCs, pharmaceuticals, nanomaterials, personal care products)

  • Subtopic #2A: Hazard identification and assessment
  • Subtopic #2B: Standards development and protectiveness assessments
  • How are existing paradigm approaches serving us well in addressing these new classes of potential contaminants?
  • How can we do better?
  • Where are our blind spots?
  • Subtopic #2C: Environmental aspects of commercial-scale cannabis production and use
  • What environmental issues are specific to commercial-scale cannabis?
  • What (if anything) is being done to access, monitor, or otherwise address these issues?

 

Topic #3: Stakeholder Engagement seeks to describe successes and identify opportunities for improvement/ growth/needs in engaging with non-technical stakeholders

  • Subtopic #3A: Community outreach
  • Subtopic #3B: Risk perception and tolerance
  • Subtopic #3C: Science-based decision making
  • Subtopic #3D: Engagement with public agencies, elected officials, and policymakers
  • Subtopic #3E: Environmental/social/economic justice for impacted communities
  • How can scientists, engineers, and other technical experts effectively engage, and educate/inform non-technical stakeholders?
  • How do we most effectively incorporate feedback into the compliance/cleanup process?
  • How do technical experts effectively use/explain science to help non-technical stakeholders accurately understand the risk, choices, and cost associated with environmental compliance/cleanup?

 

Topic #4: Environmental Stewardship in the 21st Century

  • Subtopic #4A: Understanding and anticipating societal expectations and needs
  • How can scientists, engineers, and other technical experts receive feedback from non-technical stakeholders on their needs/expectations?
  • Do the highest priorities identified by the environmental industry/leading experts align with the highest priorities of the society we are attempting to protect?
  • Subtopic #4B: Perspectives on motives for stewardship
  • What is the full-range of motives that drive toward environmental stewardship, and how might our industry use this information to find common ground across a wider swath of society, particularly when there are opposing viewpoints? Some examples of motivations include moral/ethical, duty-bound, individual rights, rule-compliance, economic driver, environmental/social justice. 
  • What are other stewardship motivations, how do they interplay with each other, and how can we be effective at providing the maximum benefit to society?
  • Subtopic #4C: Reclaiming impacted properties and land
  • Are there examples from land/property reclamation that might help illustrate a blueprint for balancing risk, cost, and protectiveness as we provide for Colorado’s “environmental landscape”?
  • Subtopic #4D: The true cost of environmental compliance and remediation
  • What are typical “externalities” (i.e., consequence of an industrial or commercial activity that affects other parties without this being reflected in the cost of the goods or services involved) that are commonly excluded from assessments of environmental compliance/cleanup?
  • How might including these externalities in environmental compliance/cleanup assessments or evaluations impact the selection of the preferred outcome?
  • What methods are available and appropriate for measuring and addressing these externalities?

 

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMITTAL:  July 17, 2017

Please submit your Title, Abstract/Summary (<500 words), Author(s), Affiliation, and Biography (<200 words)
in a MS Word-compatible format to Steve Brauner at sbrauner@integral-corp.com

Questions? Call/email Steve Brauner (Conference Chair) at 303-328-7982 or sbrauner@integral-corp.com

Date: 
Monday, July 17, 2017 - 11:15
Location: 
CEMS, PO Box 2427, Evergreen, CO 80437-2426

Attached File

Denver, CO